Voters Navigate Through New Political Maps

Voting, it seems, isn’t as simple as it once was.  With a brand new political landscape in Madison, Wisconsin, voters may have to bring maps, compasses, and scorecards to determine who exactly they are voting for.  GbBIS takes a look at how changing political geographies, such as congressional districts, can affect a population. 

  

The primary elections held in Madison, Wisconsin last week surely left some voters scratching their heads.  This primary election marked the first time new district lines drawn up by Madison lawmakers were put in play.  What these new district lines created wasn’t by any means a pretty sight.

The new district lines created a jumble of open seats, races with multiple candidates and incumbents pushed into new territories. A number of Democratic lawmakers wound up having to change districts or compete against long-time colleagues.  Primary elections are not very popular among voters, but confusion due to redistricting likely caused an even greater number of voters to stay away.

New political district maps are drawn every 10 years to account for population growth and decline in the most recent Census.  These district maps aren’t only useful tools for voters and politicians, they are also useful for businesses.  Businesses that want to market to a certain political party or want to know the political affiliations of their target demographic use political maps to make more informed decisions.

 

GbBIS maintains the highest quality political data.  These data include state, county, and city boundaries, as well as congressional and state legislative boundaries.  Our data is the most accurate and the most frequently updated.  When political boundaries change, we are one of the first to know. Our political data is available as data on maps, web applications, and databases.

 

Contact GbBIS today and discover how our political data can help your business make informed decisions

 

Visit Us on the Web at gbbis.com

Or

Call Us at 1-877-447-6277

 

Image 1,4 via gbbis.com, Image 2 via ldjackson.com, Image 3 via medianj.com

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